Sticky Learning Lunch #57 HBDI Model & Whole Brain Thinking – Part #3

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HBDI Model & Whole Brain Thinking #3

In this HBDI model #3, find out more about the HBDI Whole Brain Thinking ®. Do you want to understand more about the way you prefer to think, communicate, and make decisions using the HBDI ® assessment?

Using the HBDI ® assessment, understand how you can use your profile to help adapt your thinking, decision-making, and communication style to improve audience engagement. Identify how to improve team effectiveness, through better problem-solving and effective feedback.

Brain coloured in four parts to show HBDI model
How well do you know HBDI?

 

You Can Read the Full Transcript Below:

Nathan Simmonds:

Good afternoon. Sticky lunch, as he says. Where’s that from? The beginning slide. There we are. Boom. We’re in. Welcome to today’s session, part four of HBDI. I am getting, I’m getting better with this now. Uh, I keep getting confused in my acronyms. Who have we got in? We’re just waiting for the last few people to arrive. Gareth, good to see you, Howard. Thanks for being here. Cindy, thanks for being here Again, Colin Martin, Victoria, Fabian, wonderful. Thanks for being here.

Nathan Simmonds:

Last people coming into the room as always, let’s get, make sure we’re getting everyone set up for success. Mobile phones, little airplane lit up, zero out. Distraction, a hundred percent attention on what we’re doing here. Making sure that you’ve got a drink. Keep yourself hydrated and your brain lubricated to make sure this learning sticks. And finally, as the third part of this is always get a fresh page for fresh thinking. And these are the things that you wanna remember, that you want to reread and reignite that thinking so that you can keep this learning expanding. Uh, I say we dive in, Andy, we see where this goes. And if people are late, so be it.

Nathan Simmonds:

That’s their loss. So welcome to today’s sticky learning with me, Nathan Simmons, senior leadership coach and trainer for MBM Making Business Matter, home of Sticky Learning. We are the leadership development and soft skills provider to the grocery and manufacturing industry. And the idea of these sessions is to help you be the best version of you in the work that you do, whether that’s from home or returning back to the office. Right now we’re hitting what day four is it? Day? No, it’s day three of HB di and we’re looking at practical ways to make your work easier. Where are we going? Andy.

Andy:

That’s good. I was just looking at that photo of me in the, uh, in the slide deck. I reckon I’ve been trading off that for about five years.

Nathan Simmonds:

We need to update that.

Andy:

Indeed. Uh, okay. Good. Uh, afternoon everyone. Where we’re going. We’re gonna build off the last two days with some further application of the HBDI, um, and brain dominance instrument model. So, day one we talked about what is it and getting into the backgrounds using our, um, our words up here today. We’re gonna look into, uh, some areas around giving feedback. I know that’s gonna link nicely to what you’ve got going on next week, Nathan.

Andy:

Um, how to recognize styles, because I think that came up as a question yesterday. Um, and then I’ve got some other areas that we can dip into depending upon time. The other bit I’m really keen to do today is, um, almost that kinda live q and a. Um, we’ve hopefully kind of intrigued you over the last couple of days, so you may well have generated some questions or some thoughts.

Andy:

Um, I’d like to spend some time going through that today, making sure that you feel very comfortable. Um, you’re getting a good understanding of this. And then, uh, allowing you to springboard off and, um, kind of make it your own as appropriate. Um, and to that point, thank you again, um, to all those people that have purchased profiles already. We’ll be getting those, um, instructions and the online questionnaire out to you in the next, uh, few hours. Thanks again and reminder to those, if you do want to buy your own profile, 10% off for this week. So Nathan, uh, we’re get a link dropped in there for those that continue to be interested.

Nathan Simmonds:

I was gonna say, you know, you’re not gonna get it cheaper anywhere. Uh, any other point at this as you are gonna get it now. So if you haven’t got a copy, if you haven’t got your own profile and you are looking to get that deeper insight into yourself, which supports the leadership model that we’ve already covered, which supports how we’re delivering feedback next week, now it’s time to do it for sure.

Andy:

Perfect. Alright, Nathan, I’m gonna ask you to jump straight to slide 16, if you wouldn’t mind. Um, question came out. Gonna say, I think it was from Mohamed, correct me if I’m wrong. Apologies if I am. We were talking about, um, famous people through history. We might have to come down. One more, Nathan.

Nathan Simmonds:

There we go.

Andy:

There we go. Perfect. Um, so we’re talking about famous people through history, um, and where they would potentially sit on, uh, on our model. I say potentially because of course I wasn’t able to get these guys to all complete their home and profiles in the last 24 hours. Uh, reached out to a few of them, a couple of them weren’t available. Um, but have a good look around that. You’ll start to get a sense of, uh, where people w would sit within this model. Um, likes of Bertram Russell up there, philosopher and mathematician sits nicely up in the blue. Come down into green.

Andy:

Let’s pull out. Uh, Susan b Antony. Um, I think she was social reformist for women’s rights and you know, the steps and the stages that she went through to, uh, to make that happen. Up into the yellow, the likes of Jeff Bezos, uh, entrepreneur, Amazon Blue Horizon, you know, lots of things that he’s got going on there. We see Steve Jobs up there as well. Another big entrepreneur and big visionary thinker coming down into the reds. We’ve got people there such as, um, Louis Armstrong. Just going to prove it really is a wonderful world. See what I did there.

Nathan Simmonds:

I gotta say. I see what you did there. Um, my question to people watching this is, is are there any people on there that you are surprised that they’re in those quadrants? Anyone you want to call out as to why, you know, doesn’t quite fit or you are surprised to see them while they’re coming in? Good. The question that I’ve got already that comes off that is Abraham Lincoln’s right in the middle there. What’s going on with that?

Andy:

Abraham Lincoln. So Deante, was he, I think he came back the other day. It was a question on day one. You know, can you be equal across all those quadrants? Um, understanding and considering the things that he did and how he did them, um, they believe that he sits in that middle so he could have a a square across all those quadrants. That half worked to my finger sending to a bit of a weather person.

Nathan Simmonds:

Yeah, it’s nice. Here’s your backdrop.

Andy:

Yeah, so he maybe sits in the middle and has a, an equal preference to all of those, uh, those quadrants.

Nathan Simmonds:

Nice, nice. That’s good to see some of the people in there to start to see, start to understand how their thinking is or where they focus their thinking in order for them to achieve what they’ve done.

Andy:

Absolutely. Did, did we get questions or thoughts coming in or has everyone gone yet? That makes sense?

Nathan Simmonds:

Nothing. I think everyone’s quite happy with that. If there’s no answers, we’ll take that as a confirmation they’re comfortable with where everyone is on there.

Andy:

Fine. Fantastic. Um, let’s go down another slide please, Nathan. I’m gonna introduce, um, topic around giving feedback. Um, feedback is that free gift that can just absolutely improve people. And if delivered in the right way, it becomes a super powerful thing. I know you’re gonna get into this, uh, in a lot more detail next week. Nathan, you’ve got particular, um, area of expertise on this. I wanted to link it in nicely because actually we can also use the, the Herman profile to deliver feedback in a way that will be more comfortably and easily more received depending upon the audience and who they are.

Andy:

So we’re gonna talk around feedback in a minute and I’m gonna share some slides on how you can recognize styles. ’cause appreciate we can’t go in or we could, but we, we can’t and we don’t always know other people’s thinking, decision making, communicating preferences. But I’ve got a few slides that can hopefully give those little tells and give those indicators. Um, that said, and very similar to yesterday when we were talking about expectations of the audience, if unsure, let’s get a tick in each of those boxes. Again, spot those things that resonate with people and they’re kind of, oh, I guess that that’s, that’s kind of going in and making sense. We start to really build on those particular areas.

Andy:

So giving feedback, if we would start up in our a quadrant or blue quadrant, if we’re giving feedback to someone that has a high preference here, it’s gotta be about precise, logical facts and detail. It’s sticking to the data and ensuring that it’s delivered in a way that is absolutely clear cut. When I talked yesterday about the blue quadrant being kind of very black and white, they don’t want too much ambiguity. They just want to know what it was and being very precise and very logical in delivering that set of feedback. That makes sense. It makes sense to, and I think that’s good. Coming down into our green quadrant people here, they’re gonna need to see the structure and the organization and the feedback.

Andy:

They’re not gonna want it too wooly. They’re not gonna want it delivered in a way that um, um, it’s gonna be hard for them to interpret. So we need to have that sequential approach. Again, paying attention to the detail. It’s that whole left brain thing going on. So it’s gotta be done in a very safe risk adverse way to ensure that as they’re receiving that feedback, they’re getting in a way that just works for them. So we can break that feedback down in steps and stages, helping it unfold for them. Um, and with a view that it just gets absorbed in a far more powerful way than if we were to maybe deliver it on the opposite side or the diametrically opposing quadrant to a yellow person.

Andy:

They’re gonna want metaphors, they’re gonna wanna understand stories and what ultimately the outcome or the piece that could happen if based on that particular bit of feedback. So it’s about definitely being a bit more creative and holistic in delivering it and maybe in a more imaginative way as opposed to being too rigid and too detailed, which is gonna more better appeal to our people over on the left hand side coming down into our red quadrant. It’s paying more attention to the empathy side of people using eye contact, measuring it’s delivered in a way that, uh, doesn’t unbalance the feelings that they will have on that particular thing.

Andy:

And sometimes feedback delivered wrongly can be horribly detrimental. We’ve gotta do it right And for the reds it’s gonna be hugely important that it feels right for them in using those words like feeling. Okay. Lemme pause there for a moment. Pause there for a moment. Nathan, your, your thoughts. ’cause I know this is a hot topic for you.

Nathan Simmonds:

Absolutely. And, uh, partly we’re gonna get into this a little bit and feedback. So this is wonderful that we’re lining these, these two elements up is always, uh, is the prime thing that we learn in influencing skills. What’s in it for me? But the issue with actually teaching people what’s in it for me is, oh yeah, put yourself in their shoes and think about what’s in it for me. But you don’t put yourself in their shoes, you just walk out of the classroom thinking what’s in it for me? And actually you need to think about what’s in it for them.

Nathan Simmonds:

How do they need to hear this? Um, how do, what words do they use? What’s gonna emotionally resonate with them and how do I make sure they get that message and they hear it so that they can do what they need to do. And in then in turn, I get what I need by giving them what they need. And it’s not a chicken and egg scenario, it’s gotta be about, you know, making sure they can hear it. So you get what you need as a secondary side as a, as a side effect.

Andy:

Terrific, terrific. Okay. Um, what are people’s thoughts on that? Um, kinda maybe just have a quick few questions if we’ve got them, because I’m keen, uh, to kinda maybe use of time that we’ve got. So if there’s anybody’s got thoughts in the moment.

Nathan Simmonds:

Yeah. So, um, clearly linked back to the point that they are the focus of what I do. They are the focus of what you do. Absolutely. Colin, um, question here from Victoria is, are there more people in each quadrant? IE more blues in the world? I’ve done similar profile and I’m, I’m split fairly equally across three 34% red, 31% green, 26 yellow and nine blue. And not sure if this is common or unusual.

Andy:

I think if we were to uh, uh, set entire 7 billion people or so on the, on the planet, we, we, we’d see broad balances and averages across those particular areas. There’s then some quite interesting cultural and country, um, biases that tend to happen. Um, I guess the short answer is yes, there’s balance, but then we can look into it a whole, a whole host of other ways. I have to be careful with my next statement ’cause it can often get taken outta context. If we were to look at say, just a split between male and female, we often see that females are far more red down here and why people can get a little bit maybe, uh, uncomfortable or feel that that’s, um, maybe not what they want to hear.

Andy:

We’ve got to then kind of look back at ourselves as a species, um, and understand that is often the female species that are the nurturers the child. You know, it’s all that stuff that’s going on. So throughout our evolution, naturally we see females down here a little bit more in the red, but that’s it. Going back to your point, I think there’s a good balance across, uh, all of these quadrants if we were to, uh, look at it as a, a far more broader point of view.

Nathan Simmonds:

Alright. I agree. And I think evolution and biology is starting to shift that where you are seeing, you know, the variety of, um, genders and, and kind of the blurred line that’s happening in those spaces, which is, you know, it’s gonna be an interesting thing that I don’t think we’re gonna see the end of that game plan lifetime.

Andy:

And this, and I keeps, I keep bang on about this point ’cause it’s super important. This is about preference, preference to communication, decision making. Yeah. What it is and is pigeonhole. And people are going, oh, the ladies are here and all the men are up there. It’s not like that at all. And absolutely we can’t do that because it’s a, not appropriate. And b, we have got a whole brain and we have access to all of it. That’s super important.

Nathan Simmonds:

And that’s the important part. And like I said before, you know, if you put yourself in one of those categories and say, I can’t do that, you then you stop yourself from seeing the world in a different way that’s gonna support you moving forward.

Andy:

Yeah. It almost becomes that self-fulfilling prophecy. I’m only this, I’m only that. I’m not gonna touch that stuff. We, we’ve always got to push and make effort and have a level of bothered to to, to continue being the best version of ourselves.

Nathan Simmonds:

Mm-Hmm. Agreed.

Andy:

Come down to one more slide for me. Think, because it kind of builds on it, but it also builds on the point you just made. Um, it’s about making the person the center of maybe for feedback, making them the important one. This sort of builds on it nicely, but it’s about how we can, um, design or be considerate to when we’re teaching someone something. And that learning can happen in a classroom similar to what you and I do for a living, but it also happens in a one-to-one basis. We’re developing the people that we work with and we can then be mindful of how we’re training them, coaching them, guiding them, encouraging them, delegating to them, and all those different management tools that we have.

Andy:

But doing it in a way, again, that’s gonna resonate with them because how you would want to receive it could be very different to how they want to receive it. Um, what I’m not gonna do is, is talk around all of those words in that box. You know, you, you’re largely scanning it and you’re seeing the differences and the similarities between those areas, but it just allows you to have, again, that toolbox that you can select various things from depending upon the situation that you’re in.

Andy:

And it was all about that dialing stuff up, dialing stuff down based on the audience or the individual or the situation. Um, so there’s some core pieces there that, um, again, hopefully provide a little bit of for thought provocation. Um, and again, just building on that, uh, toolkit that we all have.

Nathan Simmonds:

Nice.

Andy:

What

Nathan Simmonds:

Questions come up?

Andy:

You, Nathan? Just, uh, it’s quicker to get an answer from you. What, what, what’s in there that kind of resonates with you?

Nathan Simmonds:

Uh, it’s just for me as an l and d practitioner and a coach and, and consultant and all those things, is, it is just about making sure that we are ticking the boxes. So you can see that there’s the hands on activities, they’re the icebreakers. Um, and I, and some people actually get irritated by icebreakers. It’s ’cause it’s not their thing, but at the same time it is someone else’s. So whenever you are in that kind of team environment, again, it’s helping the people in your team understand it’s not all about them.

Nathan Simmonds:

You know, and getting them to kind of have that philosophy as a leader that they start thinking, well actually this is for the benefit of other people in the team, so I’m gonna play along with this and support it because it supports them.

Andy:

Absolutely. And I’ll have to be very, very overt with exactly that point and say to a group people, Hey, look, some stuff is gonna resonate with you more than others. And then in turn, you know, the flip could happen later on. Be mindful because of all of this stuff that certain things will float your boat, others will not. But for the person sat next to you or opposite you, it’s gonna be very, very different. Um, and we can do the stuff around kind of signposting, oh, we’re gonna be the next 20 minutes, we’re gonna be doing a session on blah, that the greens just go, right, good, I get this.

Andy:

But the yellows, we can go right, we’ve got some imagery that we’re gonna use to help bring us to life so they can start to create that mental picture. Go get a tick in all of these boxes and at the same time know that not everything will resonate with everyone all of the time and, and just being comfortable with that.

Nathan Simmonds:

Agreed. Agreed. And I thought we’d shut my email down, down and it suddenly appeared. Apologies for that. No worries. So where else can we take this in now? Now? No, not at all. Um, is there anything that we’ve got in here that we can kind of best use? How can we take this stuff and then take it to another level while we’re working with our people?

Andy:

I think the first part is having that awareness that we can do stuff differently. It’s moving from that place of, um, that for want of a better word, conscious incompetence through to being consciously aware that we can do stuff differently. And then testing stuff out. As we take those small confident steps of trying different things, figuring out what works for us, doing more of that, figuring out what stuff doesn’t work for us, and then doing less of that, but constantly having that continuous improvement cycle going. And at the same time, not trying to do it all at once because we ultimately we’re, we’re gonna fall over

Nathan Simmonds:

And maybe we start that with one or two people in our team that we go, okay, well actually what quadrant do they sit in if, you know, if you’ve got them to do a profile, maybe you, you drip feed those profiles into your team or into a small unit inside your business. Starting to have a look at that is and then start to see what it is they need in order for you to communicate with ’em and start building on that and then start to, to move that out into wider circles of the business.

Andy:

Absolutely. Absolutely. Okay, let’s, um, continue to move on. Just again, a mindful of time. We’re probably pushing, uh, yeah, pushing, uh, fast towards 20 parts. It was a question yesterday and I said I’d come back to it today. So I absolutely wanted to was how can we recognize styles? Um, easiest way, get people to complete a questionnaire. I mentioned that one earlier. Other than this, you’ve got to look for those . So I’ve got a few slides again, we’re just gonna bounce off them a little bit.

Andy:

Um, and you’ll start to help bring this life again, but also help you to then go, ah, maybe that person is such and such. Let me explore that a little bit more. Let me test my theory. Lemme test my hypotheses on it. And then, um, maybe I can tailor some things I do with them differently. So for the blues, this is absolutely about fact. It’s about illustrating points clearly. Um, emotions are obviously kind of, um, uh, displayed slightly more, uh, abstractly. You’re not gonna have those big, oh, that’s amazing, that’s brilliant. I’m absolutely loving this. It’s far more kind of calmer.

Andy:

Um, so we can start spot those people that are talking in facts, talking details and enjoying those things at the same time, maybe not getting as much of an emotional reaction to certain situations that, uh, we would probably see somewhere else down here.

Nathan Simmonds:

Mm-Hmm, . So my, my question to those people that are listening in, who do you know that is a blue? Who in your world that you know, you interact with and interrelate with, you know, on a regular basis is in that blue quadrant? Where are we going to next? So sort of look,

Andy:

Go down, let’s go down to green. Brilliant green’s. Again, these are some of the things that they will display. They’re gonna be very concrete in their speaking. Very matter of fact. Again, they will ask questions that have answers and why. That seems like quite a strange sentence. Um, when we move through to yellow again, you’ll start to see the differences that, uh, I think so if they ask a question, they know there’s an answer and that you’re getting that they want that answer. And it is about completing sentences and not dropping off midway because their brain’s got off, uh, into some other dimension.

Um, so again, it’s this whole left brain thing going on. It’s about logic and fact and rationality order process. Uh, again, you can start to spot those people and, and again, you know, same question as Nathan’s just posted. Consider those people in your world where it’s personal or professional and you go, oh, maybe Soandso is a, uh, a green, or maybe they’re a blue or red or a yellow. And you can start to maybe test your hypothesis, uh, in the coming days.

Nathan Simmonds:

I was gonna say, you know, it is those people that you know, who in your life is green’s. A reason I’m asking this question is because as you get into next week with the feedback and what we’re looking at here is starts to tailor your conversation to fit those people.

Andy:

Yeah, absolutely. Okay. Our red people are people that light up the room. So this is about face animated eye contact. There’s some of this stuff going on. These guys may use stories to illustrate points, uh, far more nonverbal gestures and then maybe spotting at times. They’re good communicators, so they talk out loud and they may talk to themself and you’re gonna hear that stuff and it’s all that brilliant red stuff coming through that’s absolutely about feeling and communication. And you can spot these guys. These will be the people that come in and they wanna know about you.

Andy:

How was your weekend? What did you get up to last night? They want to hear and they genuinely have bothered this for you. And, and likewise, they’re gonna expect that back from them. I used to have a similar situation where I’d come home from work. Um, my wife would wanna know how my day was. I had no motivation or need to tell her about it, but it was important to her. So now we have that time and I’ve learned to take the time now to ask her how her days, because apparently that’s super important as well.

Nathan Simmonds:

Well, it is to a, you know, a long lasting marriage as well as you know, Andy.

Andy:

Yeah. And, and I’m starting over the last few days I’ve starting to realize I may well be compressing that duration. So, uh, yeah, brilliant. There we go. Last but not least, last but not least, I I yellow quadrants. Um, these people far more whimsical, far more, um, speaking kind of phrases they do and can tend to stop mid-sentence because their brain’s gone further off into the future. And to that point, the opposite of the green, asking questions that lead to other questions, not necessarily asking questions that have answers.

Andy:

So it’s far more abstract and it’s about using those, those metaphors and those, um, imagery to bring things to life. And you’ll know those people and certainly you’ll spot these people easier if you’re not in that quadrant from over here. You go, oh, that’s why they talk like they do. I thought they were just a bit, oh, and again, we’ve gotta come back to this tolerance part that just become, when someone speaks or acts or communicates in a different way, just potentially because they come from maybe an opposite quadrant to yourself. So again, banging home that point, it’s gotta be all about tolerance and then being mindful of what they need and giving it to them.

Nathan Simmonds:

Mm-Hmm. Interesting thing is that I know that I’m kind of in the, in the yellow bordering on the red, so I can dip into the emotional. My wife is green and dips into the red. So we, that’s where we meet in our conversations, but we are diametrically opposed in a lot of things. It’s just the way that we work. But when I look at myself as a coach, I ask questions that lead to other questions, but I use the coaching framework in order to make sure that it’s funneling in and actually getting, you know, and I’m asking a question that’s leading to a point. It may not be my point, it’s that other person’s point. So again, it’s just dialing up those relevant elements to, to help people get results.

Andy:

Absolutely. Absolutely. Brilliant. Okay. Um, so there were the four quadrants, again, just dipping into each of those four stars, helping you to maybe recognize them better come back to that point if unsure. Tick in each box. Um, let’s see what questions we’ve got. Maybe we’ve got a little bit of time left at the end of our third and final day. Uh, see what questions people have got.

Nathan Simmonds:

Uh, one questions directly to me is, I would’ve seen you as a green. There are elements which I switch on and off, um, but when I think, I think very, very big and I think about combining ideas and I think very abstractly. Um, so I have, when I’m working in certain spaces, I have a, a fairly, uh, not unique, but a fairly kind of focused ability to take two completely different ideas, smooth ’em together, and create a third object. Um, yeah, and that’s very yellow of me. I use the green to create that form, to create the structure.

Nathan Simmonds:

Um, but I also know on the other side of that, there is no, you win hearts and minds. You don’t win minds and hearts. So it has to be the hearts first that you have to work in that emotional space before people even want to hear the facts and the details. Or if they do want to hear the facts and details, it actually is, um, bolstered up by the emotional content and the impact that that stuff has on people. So it’s about switching those things on at the right time.

Nathan Simmonds:

Um, and I also think it’s about leveraging the strengths out of each of them. So when we talk about form, if you look at a training session, if you look at a sticky learning lunch or you look at one of our virtual classrooms, you know, we talk about, there’s a clear structure to it. So every one of these sessions, as we build ’em up over the course of the nine weeks, has started to build that framework that we then just slot the elements into. That gives you that structure. And people understand what they’re gonna get from these sessions. They, they understand where the session’s gonna go to.

Andy:

Uh, it’s absolutely right Nathan, anything we do in design, start with the why now, why are we doing this? Why, you know, what’s our objectives for this session? What do we want to give to the good people that have come in? What, and coming down to detail, how are we gonna deliver it? Who’s gonna be involved, structure the agenda and, and, and they’ll just link together and talk me through like that, that stuff’s all just obvious, but sometimes we can maybe skip one or two of these areas in, in tasks or projects or situations that we do. Uh, and we can wonder then why it didn’t and wasn’t as effective as it could be.

Nathan Simmonds:

Agreed. I think

Andy:

Martin

Nathan Simmonds:

Martin’s come back with the color of purple of MBM logo is the perfect mix of red and blue chosen on purpose.

Andy:

uh, no, it wasn’t. I’d, I’d love to say it was, uh, the irony are, um, are, uh, ahead of the, uh, the ship, so to speak. So colored line. So you probably wouldn’t have even known that. I’m not sure if he’s in today. But, um, yeah, I think that was plugged. But I’d love to have said yes to that. I might, uh, I might take that and run with it, make that my own.

Nathan Simmonds:

I thought I missed the MBM logo bit at the beginning of the thing and I thought that was kind of a, a poke at my shirt from Monday or something. But that. So the Gareth’s got here very helpful tips on recognizing styles, although important not to be caught pigeonholing it, which is something that we have reinforced time and time again. Um, and not, you know, pigeonholing or modeling someone needs to be subtle.

Andy:

Mm. So, so that,

Nathan Simmonds:

So it was, is although important not to be caught pigeonholing or modeling someone, it needs to be subtle. So, you know, you are, you are looking for those, um, those, what’s the word I’m looking for? Not trip wise is the wrong word, but they’re just those core elements, those individual words that just allude to the breadcrumbs of actually what this person’s style is. So you can actually have, uh, for the conversation.

Andy:

I think so. And if you try to do it in a way that feels a little bit pretentious, it’s gonna be spotted a mile away and you lose your credibility. Um, often when we do this with teams, it’s done in a very open way and everyone’s very comfortable sharing their profiles. What they then overtly get is that common language that they can start to share. I think the moment we start pointing fingers across the office, oh, I think they’re red, or I think they’re a yellow. I think we’re a doing this a huge disservice. And we’d also more importantly, doing them a, a huge disservice as well. It’s absolutely not about pigeonholing, it is about just better understanding ourselves and others.

Nathan Simmonds:

Agreed. Agreed. What question? I mean I, what’s been useful to everyone that’s listening today? What’s been of value, what’s resonated for you that you’re gonna take away from this session that’s gonna help you, you know, improve and build these conversations? And the second part to that is what questions have you got? So what’s been of value and what other questions have you got right now? And if you haven’t got any, by all means put no in the box just so we know that you’ve got everything you need today.

Nathan Simmonds:

Good. So while that’s coming through, I put the link in there again for the, the HBDI profiles with and the discount coding is in there as well. So if you are looking and you want to get that deeper understanding, click on that link. Get yourself a profile if you haven’t already done so. You can start to get that clarity. Um, ’cause this stuff’s really gonna be useful for when we’re go into feedback or if you go back and look at the leadership stuff. The other part as well is if you have not signed up for next week’s session about feedback, and I’m gonna add a little bit to that in a minute, now is the time to do that. We’ll get the link in there for next week sticky learning lunch, which is there right now so you can get signed up for next week.

Nathan Simmonds:

Now, anyone here that has people in their responsibility, anyone here that is associated with another leader of people that thinks that they would benefit from learning about how to deliver feedback in a very thoughtful structured fashion that gets results every single time, share that link with them. We’re gonna be doing feedback for four days and I’m gonna take you through start to finish every single level of delivering feedback, um, using a very specific framework that’s gonna help you get better results in what you do.

Nathan Simmonds:

If you know people that are gonna benefit from that, copy that link, email it to them, tell them I would love to see them in the room. And I’m gonna be sharing some really key elements that are gonna make feedback really work. So what do we got coming through? Um, apply this model on feedback, certainly useful. Yes it is.

Nathan Simmonds:

And then when we do next week, it’s gonna make it a thousand times more powerful when you get into that, uh, what we’ve got here. Be vigilant of wording used, describing profile so as not to unintentionally pigeonhole. Absolutely Cindy, that’s a mate. Like if you take that away, you’ll be looking for the words, but you won’t be, you know, um, separating or or isolating people through that language. All good. No questions. Thanks guys. Gareth, very welcome. No questions from me. Thanks to both of you. Very interesting, nice foundation for feedback. Signed up, ready for these sessions. Colin.

Nathan Simmonds:

Great, glad you’re in the room. I don’t think Colin’s missed a single episode, uh, which is amazing. Thank you Colin, for the support. Um, Garrett’s been here for a lot of them as well. Howard has been engaged with those as well. It’s been amazing. Tim’s been in a lot of these as well. Um, Fabian’s, you know, been here for a lot of the last ones as well. Uh, what is the 10% coupon code to get the coupon code in there? If you scroll up to it a little bit higher, that is 10% voucher code. So when you go and get your HBDI profile, you can put that in, it’ll give you 10% off I believe, Andy.

Andy:

Yeah, absolutely. If you, if you page down for me just in our, uh, our, our deck of slides, it will, that’s it. That’s effectively what you get, your complete 120 questions. It will give you an understanding or give you your home and profile, your profile in terms of what it looks like across those quadrants and your preferences. So bear with me the equivalent of, of one of those. And then the other pages that maybe you see on there with the, uh, the explanation, the booklet that supports it and, and the full pack. What also comes with that is digital debrief.

Andy:

So you, we take what we’ve covered in the last three days, but gets into it into a far more, um, appropriate level of information so you can really understand that. And that kind of digital e-learning, uh, debrief, uh, supports that pack. And at the same time having that conversation with us on a one-to-one or a group basis to ensure that you’ve got exactly what you need and you feel very comfortable with the, the results for want of a better word of this assessment.

Nathan Simmonds:

Awesome. Great Share. Amazing. So Fabian says, well done as always. Thanks very much Fabian. I appreciate your engagement and your time being here. We are on the half hour, in fact, we are on one minute over. Um, thanks very much everyone for being here. You’ve got the contact detail, the connection details for next week’s training sessions. You’ve got the connection details there to go and get your HBD profile as well. The only other thing that I’m gonna share with you all right now is the virtual classrooms.

Nathan Simmonds:

If you, your team would benefit from a conversation with either Andy or myself in supporting you in any of these leadership soft skills, niche skill sets that are required for, um, for the, the grocery and the supermarket industries and the manufacturing such as category management, the links that virtual classrooms. Click on the link come through, have a conversation with us so that we can help you and your business be the best version it can be. Andy, thanks very much for today. Really appreciate it.

Andy:

Pleasure as always, Nathan.

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